IRWINDALE (CBSLA) – Firefighters Thursday morning continued to make significant progress on the stubborn Bobcat Fire burning in the Angeles National Forest and Antelope Valley foothills amid a new investigation into whether Southern California Edison’s utility equipment may have sparked the blaze.

A firefighting helicopter makes a water drop, as a rainbow appears in the mist during the Bobcat Fire in the Angeles National Forest on Sept. 23, 2020 near Pasadena, Calif. (Getty Images)

The fire has burned at least 113,986 acres and was 50% contained as of Thursday morning. At least 47 homes have been destroyed.

Evacuation orders remain in effect for hundreds of homes in the Antelope Valley foothills and evacuation warnings are in place for several other communities, including Pasadena in the San Gabriel foothills.

The Bobcat Fire, one of the largest in L.A. County history, broke out a little after noon on Sept. 6 amid triple-digit temperatures near the Cogswell Dam and the West Fork Day Use area.

On Wednesday, SoCal Edison revealed that federal investigators are looking into a disturbance at a nearby substation which occurred mere minutes before the fire was reported.

The initial report of fire was at 12:21 p.m. on Sept. 6. The utility says five minutes earlier, at 12:16 p.m., a circuit at the substation experienced a possible disturbance or event. Edison says cameras captured smoke developing in the area around 12:10 p.m., prior to the activity on Edison’s circuit.

Last November, SoCal Edison agreed to pay $360 million to settle lawsuits brought by local governments over the 2017 Thomas Fire and the 2018 Woolsey Fire, both of which were likely sparked by its equipment.

This is a developing story. Refresh this page for updates. 

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